John Torontow, MD

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Dr. Torontow has been practicing at Siler City Community Health Center since 2002 and was a participant in the Community Practitioner Program from 2006 to 2011.

As a medical student, Dr. Torontow worked with Chatham County’s underserved, and it became a dream of his to return to live and work in Siler City, which is similar to the one where he grew up. The Community Practitioner Program helped him fulfill three of his passions: living in a small town, serving a multicultural population and confronting big league health challenges.

When Dr. Torontow began practicing medicine, he was one of the first physicians who found it helpful to use a handheld device to record patient notes. As an early adopter of health information technology (health IT), Dr. Torontow has always turned to new technologies to help him find efficiencies and re-imagine the way he practices medicine. Dr. Torontow is an active participant in the NC Health Information Exchange Clinical and Technical Workforce Group.

Siler City is in Chatham County, almost the exact geographical center of North Carolina. The Siler City economy is well diversified based on both agriculture and industry that includes furniture, timber and textile plants. Golf, swimming, fishing, hunting and horseback riding are available. Nearby is a large lake, the state zoo and a North Carolina mountain range that offers hiking and camping. Within an hour’s drive are the major metropolitan centers of Greensboro-Winston Salem and Raleigh-Chapel Hill-Durham.

In 2011 Piedmont Health Services (PHS) was the recipient of a grant through NCMS Foundation’s Innovative Practice Program for their Pediatric Obesity Prevention and Treatment Program. By assisting PHS to implement an information technology strategy to increase practice efficiency and safety with child hood immunizations, clinician and staff time can then be redirected to identifying and intervening with children of unhealthy weight. North Carolina has the 11th highest rate of childhood obesity in the U.S., with 32% of children age 10-17 overweight or obese. Efforts to combat childhood obesity are a key long-term strategy for improving PHS patient population. To learn more about the efforts of PHS, visit their website.

Siler City Community Health Center

 
 
 
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